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Se muestran los artículos pertenecientes a Mayo de 2011.

GIVING ADVICE

Here are some ways in which we can give give advice or make recommendations.

Click here to listen to and watch an explanation on the use of should, ought to and had better provided by teacher Alex.

Here you have some exercises.

04/05/2011 17:15 Isabel Cota Muñiz Enlace permanente. INGLÉS No hay comentarios. Comentar.

William Shakespeare

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My 4th year ESO students  are reading and abridged version of Romeo and Juliet (click here, too), by William Shakespeare.

Here you have flashcards with questions about Romeo and Juliet. (Here some more questions and answers). 

Here they have the time line of Shakespeare’s life.Here, his plays.

Here, Shakespeare’s quotations and scripts and here, Shakespeare challenges.

Here you can discover Shakespeare’s world (Here you have information about Queen Elizabeth I ).

Here Romeo and Juliet test.

Here ten curious facts about Shakespeare.

Listen to your teacher and answer these questions.

HERE a few questions about Shakespeare.

ENJOY SHAKESPEARE!!!!!!!!!

05/05/2011 16:24 Isabel Cota Muñiz Enlace permanente. INGLÉS No hay comentarios. Comentar.


FUNNYLESSONS.COM

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funnylessons.com is a website that allows you to learn English through jokes.

An easy, fun English course. You can learn the language through jokes and the challenge is twofold. You have to understand English and also the punch line.
Each lesson has vocabulary, pronunciation, etc.. In addition, other materials are available in "more resources".

11/05/2011 23:14 Isabel Cota Muñiz Enlace permanente. INGLÉS No hay comentarios. Comentar.

Passive Voice - Present Simple / Past Simple

Tense Subject Verb Object
Simple Present Active: Ritawritesa letter.
Passive: A letteris writtenby Rita.
Simple Past Active: Ritawrotea letter.
Passive: A letterwas writtenby Rita.

When rewriting active sentences in passive voice, note the following:

  • the object of the active sentence becomes the subject of the passive sentence
  • the finite form of the verb is changed (to be + past participle)
  • the subject of the active sentence becomes the object of the passive sentence (or is dropped)

 

Passive Voice Exercises :

Present Simple.(Click HERE as well)

Past Simple.( Click HERE as well)

18/05/2011 11:21 Isabel Cota Muñiz Enlace permanente. INGLÉS No hay comentarios. Comentar.

ADJECTIVES+PREPOSITIONS

Some adjectives need a preposition before their object.

Here are some of the most common ones:

  • famous for
    France is famous for its food.
  • proud of
    He is very proud of his new car.
  • interested in
    Julie is very interested in sport.
  • pleased with
    John is very pleased with his new suit.
  • bad at
    They are very bad at maths.
  • good at
    Einstein was very good at physics.
  • married to
    My mother has been married to my father for 20 years.
  • excited about
    I’m very excited about my holiday.
  • different from / to
    Coffee is different from tea.
  • afraid of
    I’m afraid of spiders.

Click here to do an exercise.

MORE ADJECTIVES +PREPOSITIONS and another exercise.  Here another two ones.

 

24/05/2011 02:40 Isabel Cota Muñiz Enlace permanente. INGLÉS No hay comentarios. Comentar.

Some verbs + prepositions

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Some verbs are followed by certain prepositions which you must learn. For example:

Verb + Preposition: Sample sentence:
 
to accuse of  The scary man is accused of stealing.
to agree with  Do you agree with me?
to apologize for  Please apologize for being unkind to your sister!
to apply to (somewhere) Mary applied to California University.
to apply for  (something) Steve applied for a job.
to approve of  I don’t approve of smoking.
to argue with Jack always argues with Jill.
to argue about  They always argue about which TV show to watch.
to arrive in The plane arrived in New York.
to arrive at  The passengers arrived at the gate at 8:00.

Exercise HERE.

30/05/2011 16:15 Isabel Cota Muñiz Enlace permanente. INGLÉS No hay comentarios. Comentar.

TOO and EITHER

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Also

USE

"Also" is used in positive sentences to add an agreeing thought.

Examples:

  • Jane speaks French. Sam also speaks French.
  • I love chocolate. I also love pizza.
  • Frank can come with us. Nancy can also come with us.

Too

USE

"Too" is used in positive sentences to add an agreeing thought. It has the same meaning as "also," but its placement within the sentence is different.

Examples:

  • Jane speaks French. Sam speaks French too.
  • I love chocolate. I love pizza too.
  • Frank can come with us. Nancy can come with us too.

PLACEMENT

"Too" usually comes at the end of a clause.

Examples:

  • I am Canadian too.
  • I can speak French too.
  • I am studying economics too.
  • If he wants to go too, he should meet us at 8:00.

IMPORTANT

Although "too" is usually placed at the end of a clause, it can sometimes be used with commas after the subject of the sentence. This is usually only done in formal speech.

Examples:

  • Mr. Jones wanted the contract. Ms. Jackson, too, thought it was necessary.
  • Donna is working on a solution to the problem. I, too, am trying to find a way to resolve the conflict.

Either

USE

"Either" is used in negative sentences to add an agreeing thought.

Examples:

  • Jane doesn't speak French. Sam doesn't speak French either.
  • I don't love chocolate. I don't love pizza either.
  • Frank cannot come with us. Nancy cannot come with us either.

PLACEMENT

"Either" usually comes at the end of a clause.

Examples:

  • I cannot speak French either.
  • I am not studying economics either.
  • I don't want to eat either.
  • I didn't like the movie either.

Exercise HERE and HERE.

30/05/2011 16:45 Isabel Cota Muñiz Enlace permanente. INGLÉS No hay comentarios. Comentar.


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